CFE-CFE-DM, DKI APCSS Continue Partnership in Disaster Education

February 28, 2017

HONOLULU – Longtime partners, the Center for Excellence in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance and the Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies, joined forces again during the DKI APCSS Comprehensive Crisis Management Course in Honolulu, Feb. 24-27.

The DKI APCSS Comprehensive Crisis Management Course (CCM) takes a comprehensive approach to crisis management and provides 109 international Fellows with an opportunity to learn through best practices, case studies, small group discussions, mixed group exercises and individual Fellow projects.

For the forth year, CFE-DM subject matter experts presented an elective course that challenged the CCM students to apply course principles and theory while analyzing the response to a regional mega-disaster. 

“The course combines APCSS’ and our partners’ expertise to collectively provide breadth and depth to the curriculum while offering diverse perspectives in the learning,” said Jessica Ear, professor and CCM course coordinator. “The comprehensive educational objectives of this course cannot be achieved without contributions from partners.”

The CFE-DM team employed the Metro Manila Earthquake Impact Reduction Study produced by the Philippines Institute of Volcanology and Seismology to facilitate discussions with 51 international Fellows who took the elective. Building upon the lessons learned during the first half of the five-week course, the elective provided the Fellows with a deeper understanding of the complexities associated with planning a multinational disaster response, and afforded them a better understanding of the role their own organizations play.

Inspector Sita Paeniu, senior technical officer for the Maritime Police of Tuvalu, chose the disaster response elective due to recent oil spills in the main port of the small island nation.

While he said that disaster response legislation exists, questions as to which agency is responsible for what tasks still remain due to a lack of implementation experience.

“The oil in the ports and fisheries is the first time Tuvalu has experienced a disaster-like situation,” Paeniu said. “(The Maritime Police) and the government need to practice coordination so that responsibilities are clearly known.”

Improving awareness of civil-military and military-military coordination issues was a primary objective of the three-hour elective.

“Fellows are very interested in understanding who the other players are – NGOs, international organizations, assisting militaries – and their objectives during a response,” said Dr. Elizabeth Kunce-Wagner, CFE-DM training manager and elective instructor. “If they understand the international mechanisms and different agendas, coordinating with the other players to achieve maximum unity of effort becomes clearer.”

The Fellows were asked to apply lessons and discuss ideas from other course lectures in relation to a disaster response, added Kunce-Wagner. “We hope that this elective will serve to complement the other academics provided in the CCM course by providing a real-world context to the ideas and theories already presented.”


Dr. Elizabeth Kunce-Wagner, a disaster management and humanitarian assistance advisor for the Center for Excellence in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance, instructs an elective on civil-military coordination in response to a regional mega-disaster during the Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies Comprehensive Crisis Management Course (CCM) in Honolulu, Feb. 27. The CCM takes a comprehensive approach to crisis management and provides international fellows with an opportunity to learn through best practices, case studies, small group discussions, mixed group exercises and individual fellow projects.


 

 

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